3 Reasons Why “No” Is Important to Your Vision

Steve Jobs famously said, “I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.” He was ruthlessly focused as a leader. Many of us have a difficult time saying “no,” but leaders must do so for at least three reasons:

1. Lost Focus

With all the devices and all the technology, we are plagued with multi-tasking. While many insist it does not impact their ability to concentrate or do well in their jobs, research has shown that multitasking impacts our performance more than smoking pot… yeah, dude. Just as multitasking harms an individual’s performance, it impacts the performance of a ministry or organization. Focusing on too many things means you do not do any of them well.

Leaders who are comfortable saying “no” are leaders who understand the value of focus. Leaders who are comfortable saying “no” are crystal clear on their mission and priorities. If leaders do not say “no,” the team loses focus. You cannot do everything well, so to make the biggest impact – focus is essential.

2. Divided resources

Every “yes” requires investment, which is essentially a “no” to something else. Instead of making a big impact in a few critical areas, leaders who cannot say “no” spread investment thinly over a plethora of opportunities and give none of them the opportunity to flourish. Every time you say “yes” to something, you are – in essence – taking potential resources away from something else. To resource the most important, leaders are wise to starve the unimportant of resources.

3. Scattered Energy

Just as there are a finite number of resources, there is a finite amount of energy. If a leader never says “no,” energy is scattered across too many opportunities and impact is greatly reduced. A team that is passionate about everything is, therefore, a team that is ultimately passionate about nothing.

The reason leaders must constantly say “no,” is that a barrage of opportunities will constantly come the way of leaders. There is always something new, shiny, and exciting. If you want lost focus, divided resources, and scattered energy – then say, “yes” to every opportunity that comes your way.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Eric Geiger

Eric Geiger

Eric Geiger is the Senior Pastor of Mariners Church in Irvine, California. Before moving to Southern California, Eric served as senior vice-president for LifeWay Christian. Eric received his doctorate in leadership and church ministry from Southern Seminary. Eric has authored or co-authored several books including the best selling church leadership book, Simple Church. Eric is married to Kaye, and they have two daughters: Eden and Evie. During his free time, Eric enjoys dating his wife, taking his daughters to the beach, and playing basketball.

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Recent Comments
comment_post_ID); ?> good article. Where I would take exception in the seeming negativity to plant a church more organically/biblically through missional communities due to the slowness of growth. I think that's the problem with church planting in the US today is that speed of numerical growth has taken priority over true and authentic spiritual growth
 
— evansavage1
 
comment_post_ID); ?> Thanks Thom, You’re exactly correct. Now how about some solutions when confronted by one of these wayward actors?
 
— Mike
 
comment_post_ID); ?> This is hilarious. Well done!
 
— RussellC
 

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