6 Keys to Understanding and Reaching the Post-Everything Generation

How do we do renewal and outreach in the emerging “post-everything” United States culture? 

Post-everything people are those who are now in their teens and twenties, and they are our future. These persons are increasingly post-secular. They are much more open to the supernatural, to spirituality, and to religion, but not necessarily to Christianity.

In general, the church knows how to thrive in the shrinking enclaves of traditional people, but does not know how to thrive in this expanding post-everything culture.

Tim Keller, pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, thinks there is great hope for the church if it: (a) has the humility to admit we are not doing the job, and (b) in a non-triumphalistic way, advance the answers that our theology provides.

Keller goes on to add that “We must first find ways to minister in three areas: universities, big cities, and ethnically diverse situations.” He has developed 6 keys to help the church understand and reach the post-everything generation.

Download this important challenge to the church as it seeks to minister to the emerging culture from Tim Keller here.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Keller

Timothy Keller is the founder and senior pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, and the New York Times bestselling author of The Reason for God and The Prodigal God. He has also mentored young urban church planters and pastors in New York City and other cities through Redeemer City to City, which has helped launch over 200 churches in 35 global cites to date.

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COMMENTS

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Maureen Dillon, VP/Comunications/The Generational Imperative, Inc. — 01/26/14 5:50 am

Chuck Underwood is one of the pioneering scholars of Generational Study and has recently launched a training program in Generational Faith-Based Strategy for clergy of all religions. He began this program with an Ohio diocese of the Episcopal Church, whose priests have evaluated the training - and the strategy - as "transformative", saying it "changes everything". For a brief introduction to Mr. Underwood's generational consulting and training, visit: www.genimperative.com. And to receive an e-brochure that explains Generational Faith-Based Strategy, email: info@genimperative.com. Mr. Underwood is the host of four new PBS national-television shows that will air around the country beginning this summer. The ongoing series - three shows have already aired - is entitled AMERICA'S GENERATIONS WITH CHUCK UNDERWOOD.

Recent Comments
comment_post_ID); ?> I agree with your 3 must-haves. I would add that the rectors have to call on every member who attends, at least once a year. The existence of a "calling commitee" is just an excuse to avoid making the effort. This is part of #3. If a rector does not like to call on parishioners, then she/he should not be a rector, but should find a different ministry. Carter Kerns, former senior warden, Diocese of Eastern Oregon and lifelong Episcopalian Tel# 541-379-3124
 
— Carter Kerns
 
comment_post_ID); ?> Are there any reliable statistics about the percentage of church plants that fail after 3 years in the US?
 
— Jon Moore
 
comment_post_ID); ?> I am a senior citizen who has lived in many areas of the US, the farthest south being Virginia DC area. There are several church plants in the area--some failed, some doing well. One of the sadist failures was a plant in NW Washington near a large Presbyterian Church (I had been an elder in the church, so I knew the area) where changes in church doctrine was driving many away from the PCUSA churches. There were many mature Christians who lived in the area who were very willing to participate and give generously to the church. Its failure was a loss. The pastor and his wife lived in a VA suburb, wanted something that would appeal to their tastes, which included "praise music". There was a professional piano teacher and several people who had sung in choirs in the area. Their suggestions were completely ignored. Forget that there was joyous participation in singing hymns and silence by many for the praise music. The experienced church leaders that were attending were expected to seek the wisdom of the pastor who did not live in the area rather than have any role in leadership. There is another church plant in Northern Virginia that seems to be going the same way. My take: the pastors should get past their high-school and college days culture and get to know and appreciate the people of the community. Do not try to reproduce Intervarsity or Campus Crusade. Hymns are not a sin and "uneducated" (never graduated from college) should not be ignored as uninformed or stupid. People who have served in and/or live in the area are needed in leadership and not just to serve coffee and give. We all need to pray together and serve God in the community in which there is to be a plant. Glenna Hendricks
 
— Glenna Hendricks
 

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