Developing a Tagline for Your Church, Step 4: Collaborative Awareness

When developing a tagline for your ministry it’s important to consider the taglines of two other kinds of organizations in your ministry environment. Think of this next piece as a step toward ministry environment awareness. There are two kinds of organizational taglines to consider.

  1. Collaborative environment: Other ministries similar or proximate to yours.
  2. Competitive environment: Non-ministry alternatives that compete for attention and time of potential members.

For a local church, the collaborative environment (we are being kingdom-minded by not calling this “competitive”) includes other churches in you area that are trying to position themselves and build awareness.  Many churches find two to three others in this category.  For a competitive environment, think of any place that people may go other than attending church. Do you live near a waterfront community? What is the competition saying? Do you have lots of kids sports around? What promise are they trying to make?

Why is this scan important?

Before you begin reducing your brainstormed list, you want to know what’s happening around you so you can differentiate your “voice” and messaging. If you use a tagline similar to another ministry it may create confusion. For example a church once advertised itself as “the church that rocks.” Right down the street was a big sign for the “Church on the Rock.Inadvertently, they were building awareness for the church down the street. (And as you might guess the promise didn’t fit.)

Keep your list from your collaborative awareness is a place for the team to see or reference for the next step:

GO TO Step FIVE: Reduce your list to the top five taglines

Return to Church Tagline Post Overview

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Will Mancini

Will Mancini

Will Mancini wants you and your ministry to experience the benefits of stunning, God-given clarity. As a pastor turned vision coach, Will has worked with an unprecedented variety of churches from growing megachurches and missional communities, to mainline revitalization and church plants. He is the founder of Auxano, creator of VisionRoom.com and the author of God Dreams and Church Unique.

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comment_post_ID); ?> Are there any reliable statistics about the percentage of church plants that fail after 3 years in the US?
 
— Jon Moore
 
comment_post_ID); ?> I am a senior citizen who has lived in many areas of the US, the farthest south being Virginia DC area. There are several church plants in the area--some failed, some doing well. One of the sadist failures was a plant in NW Washington near a large Presbyterian Church (I had been an elder in the church, so I knew the area) where changes in church doctrine was driving many away from the PCUSA churches. There were many mature Christians who lived in the area who were very willing to participate and give generously to the church. Its failure was a loss. The pastor and his wife lived in a VA suburb, wanted something that would appeal to their tastes, which included "praise music". There was a professional piano teacher and several people who had sung in choirs in the area. Their suggestions were completely ignored. Forget that there was joyous participation in singing hymns and silence by many for the praise music. The experienced church leaders that were attending were expected to seek the wisdom of the pastor who did not live in the area rather than have any role in leadership. There is another church plant in Northern Virginia that seems to be going the same way. My take: the pastors should get past their high-school and college days culture and get to know and appreciate the people of the community. Do not try to reproduce Intervarsity or Campus Crusade. Hymns are not a sin and "uneducated" (never graduated from college) should not be ignored as uninformed or stupid. People who have served in and/or live in the area are needed in leadership and not just to serve coffee and give. We all need to pray together and serve God in the community in which there is to be a plant. Glenna Hendricks
 
— Glenna Hendricks
 
comment_post_ID); ?> I like it Mac and do agree with your opinions on the matter. Thanks much
 
— winston
 

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